Craig Washington

Craig Washington

Craig Washington was born and lovingly raised by Anna and Leon Washington in Queens, New York and has lived in Atlanta since 1992. At AID Atlanta, a multi-service AIDS organization, he serves as a Prevention Programs Manager. Craig oversees three HIV prevention programs for gay men including the Deeper Love Project, the Evolution Project, and the Gay Outreach program.

As a program coordinator at AID Atlanta, he developed education programs for Black communities including the Deeper Love Project. During this time he also served as co-chair for Second Sunday, a popular support organization for black gay men. In 1999, Craig joined Southerners On New Ground (SONG) where he engaged in multi-issue organizing and training throughout the Southeast. He has also served as the Executive Director of the Atlanta Gay and Lesbian Center and a Training Coordinator at Positive Impact, where he coordinated training services and cultural proficiency workshops for clinicians.

He has written various articles and editorials for the Huffington Post, The Atlanta Voice, the Black AIDS Institute, Georgia Voice, POZ.com, Southern Voice and The Root.com.  His essays have been published in the following anthologies: Not In My Family: AIDS in the African American Community, For Colored Boys Who Have Consider Suicide When The Rainbow is Still Not Enough, and Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call. Craig has been a founding co-chair of the annual Bayard Rustin-Audre Lorde Breakfast since 2002.  He graduated with a Master of Social Work degree from Georgia State University. He has been living with HIV for 30 years. He can be reached at www.craigwerks.com

Dee Dee Ngozi Chamblee

Dee Dee Ngozi Chamblee

Ms. Chamblee is an Executive and a seasoned advocate within and for the Transgender community, having served as a mentor, life coach, and consultant.  Ms. Chamblee brings over 20 years of solid community-based organizing and data collection experience to bear on issues that include Gender Identity, transition and health, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse prevention, mental health, and transformative social justice issues.

Currently, Ms. Chamblee serves as the Executive Director of LaGender which she founded in 2000, the first agency created by and for the Transgender community.  As Executive Director, she supervises 20 volunteer and paid staff members who provide education, intervention and outreach services to the Transgender community in the Metro Atlanta area, a community where Transgender people number in the thousands.

Prior to founding LaGender, Ms. Chamblee served as a Peer Counselor at Grady Memorial Hospital’s Infectious Disease Program, for more than a decade. Ms. Chamblee was the first transgender peer counselor to be hired by Grady Memorial Hospital and, during her tenure, was responsible for teaching professional staff about the needs and perspectives of diverse populations through trainings, workshops and symposiums. She also provided counseling and advocacy for members of the transgender community seeking support and services from service providers and as an advocate for Transformative Justice.

Since 1994, Ms. Chamblee has been a lecturer and consultant to numerous agencies and organizations regarding the unique needs of Trans and gender-nonconforming people.  She has also served on a number of boards and councils including the Ryan White AIDS Council, Atlanta GLBT Task Force and the National Advisory Board for The Center for Excellence in Transgender Health.

R. Ashley Jackson

R. Ashley Jackson

R. Ashley Jackson is an activist, advocate, fiber artist and program management consultant. Ashley assists the LGBTQ+ community in the South by designing, planning and organizing campaigns to shape public policy affecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) community.  She works with community members, business owners, elected officials and stakeholders to raise awareness of issues affecting LGBTQ+ people including racial justice; intersections of communities and youth led organizing.  Ashley served as the first Alabama State Director for the Human Rights Campaign and the first LGBT Community Advocate for the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

Ashley has Business and Marketing degrees from Hinds College and attended Auburn University Montgomery for Sociology and Political Science. Ashley has written for and been featured in CNN’s Gay in America series, and autostraddle.com.  She’s featured in Queer Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America, the film Mississippi: I Am and PhotAmerica.com.  

Ashley co-founded the Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition and served as the director for three years and co-founded QYLTS (Queer Youth Leading the South) Activist Summer Camp.  She served as a board member for the Alabama Safe Schools Coalition, Equality Alabama, the National Safe Schools Roundtable and was a member of Race Forward’s first ever Better Together Southern Cohort - a coalition working towards racial justice in LGBTQ+ communities in the south.

Ashley was recently named a New Civil Rights Leader: Emerging Voice in the 21st Century by the L.A. Times.  She’s a Mississippi native currently residing in Atlanta, GA.

Tracee McDaniel

Tracee McDaniel

Transgender Advocate Tracee McDaniel is motivated by a strong desire to ensure that all transgender and gender non-conforming people receive equality, justice and human rights protections. Tracee was born and raised in South Carolina and supported by her spouse of almost two decades. Tracee became the first transgender person in 2007 who was invited to deliver a key-note speech at the annual Martin Luther King Jr. birthday celebration march and rally in addition to lobbying the United States Congress in 2008 to support a fully inclusive Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) and increased HIV/AIDS funding.

Her personal motto “Show Up and Participate for Equality” attributed to her becoming the Founder and Executive Director of the 501(c)(3) tax exempt Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, Inc., an advocacy, consulting, and social services referral organization specifically designed to empower the diverse transgender and gender non-conforming community. Juxtaposed Center’s vision is to act as a collective body to provide basic, necessary, and fundamental services to the transgender community.

Juxtaposed Center is also an anchoring organization of the Transgender Housing Atlanta Program, which provides transitional and emergency housing to transgender and gender non-conforming people. Juxtaposed Center is the official organizer of Transgender Day of Remembrance, which is an annual vigil that memorializes transgender and gender non-conforming people whom were either murdered or committed suicide due to hate and violence against community members whom may identify as a gender that’s opposite their birth sex. Additionally, Tracee has served on the Atlanta Police Department’s LGBT Advisory Board and Mayor Reed’s Working Group on Prostitution (WGOP) and is a Vetted Trainer for the United States Department of Justice.

Tracee has served on the Board of Directors for several community initiatives, facilitated Transgender cultural competency training for Atlanta Police Department Academy recruits, and helps coordinate Atlanta's observation of Stonewall weekends, which include convening speakers' panels and marches. Currently, Tracee is a Board Director for Transgender Health and Educational Alliance, and a Transgender Housing Atlanta Program Committee Member. Most recently, Tracee was invited to brief the inaugural White House “Trans Women of Color Women’s History Month Briefing” on Employment and Economic Equity and how those inequities affect Trans Women of Color.

Tim'm T. West

Tim'm T. West

Tim'm T. West is a poet, scholar, rapper, and youth activist who was born in Cincinnati and raised primarily in rural Arkansas. A contemporary Renaissance man, he is a featured voice in multiple documentaries about hip hop and masculinity because of his groundbreaking work as a gay-identified hip hop artist, AIDS activist, and youth advocate, among other affiliations. A teacher and cultural producer at a number of secondary and post-secondary institutions, as well as a former varsity basketball coach, West has a B.A. from Duke University and graduate degrees from The New School for Social Research and Stanford University.

He is author of several books (Red Dirt Revival: a poetic memoir in 6 BreathsBARE: notes from a porchdweller, Flirting, and pre|dispositions). As a writer, West is widely anthologized and published. As a recording artist, he has  produced and released nine hip hop albums, the first several with iconic queer rap group D/DC. In 2013 he released his fifth solo project snapshots. 

Tim'm West travels and lectures widely, professionally serving as Senior Managing Director for Teach For America's LGBTQ Community Initiative, which advances educational equity for LGBTQ kids and youth K-12 as well as their educators. In July 2015 he decided to set roots in Atlanta, Georgia, with the understanding that advocating for safer schools in the South and rural areas is particularly critical.

Morna Gerrard

Morna Gerrard

As Archivist for Women and Gender Collections at GSU, Morna Gerrard collects, preserves, and makes available the records of women and the LGBTQ community in Atlanta, Georgia, and the South. Morna serves as vice president of the Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project, and in that role, she provides professional expertise and guidance, and supports the president’s outreach efforts by attending Archives Project’s presentations.

A native of Scotland, Morna was educated at Edinburgh University, Western Washington University, and Clark Atlanta University, and she has worked as an archivist at the National Archives of Scotland and Georgia State University. She has written two articles that were published in the professional journal, Archival Issues: “Putting the Georgia Women’s Movement Oral History Project on the Web: A Case Study in Collaboration and Innovation,” and “Engaging Communities: Public Programming in State Universities’ Special Collections and Archives,” (co-written with Kevin Fleming).  She has also written an essay, “No Fame Required: Collaboration, Community, and the Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project, which will be included in a forthcoming “Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections” book about acquisitions and appraisal. She is a past president of the Society of Georgia Archivists, and a Georgia Archives Institute board member. She lives in Decatur with her husband and two cats.

Hillery Rink

Hillery Rink

Hillery Rink serves as president of The Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project.  In that role he focuses on outreach to LGBTQ groups and individuals in order to arrange presentations introducing The Archives Project and its work to their organizations and social networks. In addition to his responsibilities with The Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project, Hillery works at StoryCorps, conducts oral history interviews for Georgia State University’s Special Collections & Archives, and does event management at The Fox Theatre.

Hillery grew up in North Carolina and attended UNC-Chapel Hill, graduating with degrees in history and economics.  Graduate school brought him to Atlanta, and he obtained his MBA at Emory University.  For 20+ years Hillery spent time in the business world, focusing on market research and consulting for such industries as telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, restaurants, candy, retail, and consumer packaged goods. Coming of age as a young gay man in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, Hillery is particularly interested in documenting the decade of LGBTQ life between the Stonewall Riots in 1969 and the onset of the AIDS crisis in the early 1980s. Hillery and his husband Sean legally tied the knot in California in September 2014 after 26+ years together.

Kaden Borseth

Kaden Borseth

Kaden Borseth is a trans-masculine identified advocate for LGBTQ social justice issues. He has been actively involved in the LGBTQ community since 2002. During college, he served as President of the University of Northern Iowa's Pride group for three years, helping it grow from just a few individuals to a thriving and active group. Today’s UNI Proud organization is well integrated into the university culture, offering educational, social, and activist-oriented activities to its members and the broader campus.

After graduating, he worked for several years as an Alumni Chair for Iowa Pride Network (IPN), an organization that educates and mentors middle school through college-aged LGBTQ youth. IPN empowers LGBTQ youth by cultivating their leadership skills and guiding them to create safe and accepting school environments. Kaden currently leads a support group for gender variant and transgender teens in Atlanta. 

Letitia M. Campbell

Letitia M. Campbell

 

Letitia Campbell is the Director of Contextual Education I and Senior Program Coordinator for the Laney Legacy Program in Moral Leadership at the Candler School of Theology at Emory University. A teacher, researcher, and administrator, her interests focus on religion, ethics, engaged pedagogy, and the role of religion in movements for social justice. A native Atlantan, she is proud to be associated with the Solutions Not Punishments Coalition, the #KellyOnMyMind Collective, and other grassroots justice-makers. Her academic research focuses on the history of Christian internationalism and the impact of religious activism on the movement to end human trafficking.

Previously, Letitia was the Coordinator of Community and Strategic Partnerships for Emory University’s Master’s Development Practice (MDP) program and a Lead Organizer for the Atlanta Table to Action Project. She has taught religious studies at colleges and universities, and as part of the Certificate for Theological Studies at Lee Arrendale State Prison. She has also worked as a journalist, and has experience helping grassroots and religious groups develop capacity for faith-based anti-racism organizing.  Letitia holds an M.Div. from Union Theological Seminary in New York City, a B.A. in Political Science and Gender Studies from Davidson College, and a B.A. in English Language and Literature from Oxford University. She is a doctoral candidate at Emory University, and a candidate for ordination in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Dr. Michael Shutt

Dr. Michael Shutt

Dr. Michael D. Shutt is the Interim Sr. Director of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion (CDI) at Emory University. Prior to his current role, Michael served as the Assistant Dean for Campus Life and Director of the Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Life at Emory University and was the Founding Director of the University of Georgia’s LGBT Resource Center, the first LGBT Center at a public university in Georgia.

Michael is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Counseling and Human Development in the University of Georgia’s College of Education. He served as a Co-Chair of the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals and is currently a member of the Georgia Equality Board of Directors. Michael works with institutions of higher education throughout the country in their development of LGBT support services and social justice education. Michael received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Public Administration from Michigan State University and Doctor of Philosophy in Student Affairs Administration from the University of Georgia.

Holiday Simmons

Holiday Simmons

Holiday Simmons is the Director of Community Education and Advocacy located in the Southern Regional Office of Lambda Legal, the oldest and largest national legal organization committed to achieving full recognition of the civil rights of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender people and people with HIV. With a background in social work, education and performing arts and activism, Simmons has worked with youth in foster care, taught GED, managed education initiatives and facilitated numerous creative writing and spoken word workshops with groups of youth, LGBT people, women and Africana and Latino communities both in the United States and abroad.

Prior to coming to Lambda Legal, Simmons was the psychiatric social worker at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, where he led a program for homeless people with mental illnesses. Before relocating to Atlanta, Simmons served as community initiatives manager for the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) in New York, where he gave national support and training to community members on safer schools for LGBTQ and ally students. While at GLSEN, he organized Summer Start, a week-long student training event. He also managed their national days of action including his creation, TransAction, the first national in-school student-led action focusing on gender and the larger transgender umbrella. Holiday is the former board co-chair for Queers for Economic Justice. He is the former coach of the Atlanta Youth Spoken Word Team where he helped to develop the writing and performance skills of metro Atlanta youth and took a contingent of them to HBO's Brave New Voices, the International Youth Poetry Festival each year.

Elizabeth Anderson

Elizabeth Anderson

Elizabeth Anderson is the Executive Director of Charis Circle, the non-profit programming arm of Charis Books and More, the South's oldest independent feminist bookstore. Elizabeth manages the programming, fiscal, and daily operations of Charis Circle and is always interested in the ways our communities can more creatively share skills and resources. An in-town Atlanta native, Elizabeth received a B.A. in Creative Writing from Bard College and a M.A. in English from the University of Mississippi.

Elizabeth was a 2009 Hambidge Center Fellow and a 2011 Lambda Literary Emerging LGBT Voices Fellow. Elizabeth has served on the boards of Vox Youth Communication, the Ole Miss LGBTQ Alumni Association, Georgia Shares, the Decatur Book Festival Programming Committee, and as a judge for the 2012-2015 Lambda Literary Awards. Elizabeth was a 2013 Atlanta Pride Marshall for Charis Circle and a 2014 recipient of HRC Atlanta's Leon Allen and Winston Johnson Community Leadership Award. Elizabeth is at work on a novel, Paradise Park.

Dr. Michael Adee

Dr. Michael Adee

Michael J. Adee, M.Div., Ph.D. is a human rights advocate.  He has been working in the LGBT and HIV-AIDS communities since 1988.   He earned his Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Communication at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Michael has been a university teacher, campus minister, hospice chaplain, tennis coach and a humanitarian relief worker in Zimbabwe.   

He has been involved in both LGBT political work and faith work organizing.   He served as Executive Director of Stonewall Cincinnati and as the Executive Director of More Light Presbyterians from 1999 – 2012.  He directed the successful campaign of policy change for LGBT ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA) in 2011.  After Hurricane Katrina, he created RainbowCorps, an initiative to rebuild houses in New Orleans, Louisiana.   As an out gay athlete he has competed in tennis in eight international Gay Games and World OutGames.  He climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania as a benefit for LGBT equality.  Michael directs the Global Faith and Justice Project through the Horizons Foundation, San Francisco, California.  His home is Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Dina Bailey

Dina Bailey

Dina Bailey is the Director of Educational Strategies for the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia; this new institution opened in June 2014, and has a mission to empower everyone to take the protection of every human’s rights personally. In fulfilling this mission, Ms. Bailey oversees three major components of the institution – interpretation/content, educational initiatives, and community programming.  Prior to working at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, Dina was the Director of Museum Experiences for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center where she oversaw the entire programmatic side of the institution.

Dina began her career as a high school English teacher – teaching American Literature and Advanced Placement English. Her degrees include a Bachelor of Science in Middle/Secondary Education from Butler University; a Masters in Anthropology of Development and Social Transformation from the University of Sussex; and, a graduate certification in Museum Studies from the University of Cincinnati. Ms. Bailey has been published in both the formal education and museum fields.